Anzac - The Farm Cemetery

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THE FARM CEMETERY

The Farm Cemetery with Suvla in the backThe Farm Cemetery

During his visit in 1919 Charles bean visited the area of the farm and came across what were most probably the remains of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Mervyn Nunn :

We could see the bones of men on two hills ahead of us, somewhat as in the above sketch, and (so we) cut across the valley intervening.  We found on both the further heights (they were steep, lofty spurs, leading to the crest of the range just north of Chunuk Bair) the remains of the Worcestershire Regiment and a few South Lancashires
. Those at the very top seemed to have been attacking a Turkish trench or redoubt on the hilltop.  None had gone quite to the top, but we found them very near to it, and some of those on top had bombs –old jam tin bombs- lying near them. Hughes came across what seemed to be a colonel’s coat; and the buttons showed that he belonged to the 1st Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment.

"Gallipoli Mission", (Crows Nest 1990), Charles E.W. Bean, p. 233-234

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memorials and cemeteries in gallipoli

 

IF STONES COULD SPEAK - ANZAC

 

… Another full scale assault, Mustafa Kemal’s right wing, descended like an avalanche over the flank of Chunuk Bair and on to the Farm.  There were so few survivors here that no clear account can ever be given of what happened.  Baldwin fell in close combat alongside his brigade major.  The Warwicks –or what remained of them- were wiped out.  The headquarters of 29th Brigade was overrun and every one of its officers killed or wounded.  It is probable that the slaughter around the Farm that terrible morning surpassed even that at the Nek or in the Turkish attacks on Pine Ridge earlier in the summer.  Brigade and battalion commanders fought and died shoulder to shoulder with their troops to show how the often reviled Kitchener units could behave in battle. The Turks’ casualties were horrific, for as their massed ranks emerged over the skyline they presented a target which the guns of the fleet could not miss.

"Gallipoli", (London 2000), Michael Hickey, p. 287

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Last updated : 01/12/06

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Lieutenant-Colonel Mervyn Henry Nunn